Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Old March 22nd 10, 04:31 PM posted to microsoft.public.excel.newusers
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by ExcelBanter: Mar 2010
Posts: 1
Default Functions for dummies

What does the $ & ! mean in a formula?

  #2   Report Post  
Old March 22nd 10, 04:37 PM posted to microsoft.public.excel.newusers
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by ExcelBanter: Mar 2009
Posts: 56
Default Functions for dummies


"gamegirl" wrote in message
...
What does the $ & ! mean in a formula?


"$" means that the reference is absolute, i.e. it won't change when you copy
or drag the formula.

  #3   Report Post  
Old March 22nd 10, 04:50 PM posted to microsoft.public.excel.newusers
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by ExcelBanter: Oct 2009
Posts: 905
Default Functions for dummies

"gamegirl" wrote:
What does the $ & ! mean in a formula?


Since this is a "for dummies" question, I hope you won't mind a word of
advice. In the future, include concrete examples in your question.

The answer to your question so far is: it depends on the context. You
neglect to offer anything.

In the first place, I presume you are asking about "$" and "!", not also
"&". (Hint: Don't use symbols ambiguously when you are asking about
symbols. Klunk!)

If the context is something like Sheet1!$A$10, the answer is:

1. "!" is merely a separator, a way to tell Excel that the preceding string
is a worksheet name.

2. "$" denotes an absolute reference, in contrast with a relative reference
like A1. The difference becomes evident when you copy a formula. An
absolute reference like $A$10 rarely changes. (Exception: If you delete any
one of rows 1 through 9, Excel will change $A$10 to $A$9 automagically.) A
relative reference might be changed automagically; Excel tries to be
intelligent about if and how it is changed.

For example, put the formula =A1 into B1. Now copy B1 into B2:B10. You
will see =A2 in B2, =A3 in B3, etc. In contrast, put =$A$1 into B1, and copy
B1 into B2:B10. You will see =$A$1 in all cells.
  #4   Report Post  
Old March 22nd 10, 04:52 PM posted to microsoft.public.excel.newusers
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by ExcelBanter: Feb 2010
Posts: 457
Default Functions for dummies

....and the "!" is used to seperate the Sheet name from the cell reference.

--
Best Regards,

Luke M
"Gordon" wrote in message
...

"gamegirl" wrote in message
...
What does the $ & ! mean in a formula?


"$" means that the reference is absolute, i.e. it won't change when you
copy or drag the formula.



  #5   Report Post  
Old March 22nd 10, 08:31 PM posted to microsoft.public.excel.newusers
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by ExcelBanter: Feb 2010
Posts: 181
Default Functions for dummies

As this is a learning opportunity don't forget that the absolute reference
does not have to be applied to both column and row references.

The examples given all quote e.g. $a$1

It is possible to have $a1 or a$1 depending upon your requirements.


--
Russell Dawson
Excel Student

Please hit "Yes" if this post was helpful.


"gamegirl" wrote:

What does the $ & ! mean in a formula?



  #6   Report Post  
Old July 5th 21, 12:40 PM
Member
 
First recorded activity by ExcelBanter: Jun 2021
Posts: 47
Default

Hello!

For the 3 symbols:

$ - you use this so that the ranges or cells within a formula don't change when you copy-paste or drag formulas across the spreadsheet.

& - You can use this to combine 2 cells together or concatenate them

! - Usually used as a separator or when you want to identify that the source of certain values are from different sheets of the same excel file.



For more tips on excel and Financial models, you can check this out. Hope this helps!


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
I need VLOOKUP For Dummies sharb6 Excel Discussion (Misc queries) 4 April 21st 09 09:29 PM
VBA for Dummies? Meenie Excel Discussion (Misc queries) 3 April 7th 08 06:45 PM
Macros for dummies?? NerdGirl New Users to Excel 1 January 18th 08 09:38 PM
Macros for Dummies Valerie Excel Discussion (Misc queries) 9 April 16th 07 12:26 PM
DGET for dummies Lost on DGET New Users to Excel 1 September 11th 05 02:11 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 04:40 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2021 ExcelBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Microsoft Excel"

 

Copyright © 2017