Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Old May 24th 09, 10:20 AM posted to microsoft.public.excel.newusers
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by ExcelBanter: May 2009
Posts: 1
Default what this is this mean in excel (1.66E06)

what this is this mean in excel (1.66E06)

  #2   Report Post  
Old May 24th 09, 10:50 AM posted to microsoft.public.excel.newusers
Max Max is offline
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by ExcelBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 9,221
Default what this is this mean in excel (1.66E06)

Its scientific notation:
1.66E06 =1.66*10^6 = 1660000
--
Max
Singapore
http://savefile.com/projects/236895
Downloads:25,000 Files:300 Subscribers:70
xdemechanik
---
"roofee" wrote:
what this is this mean in excel (1.66E06)

  #3   Report Post  
Old May 24th 09, 04:58 PM posted to microsoft.public.excel.newusers
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by ExcelBanter: Jan 2007
Posts: 2,059
Default what this is this mean in excel (1.66E06)

"roofee" wrote:
what this is this mean in excel (1.66E06)


I assume you mean 1.66E+06.

It is called scientific notation. It is read "1.66 times 10 to the 6th",
meaning 10 multiplied by itself 6 times (1000000). The actual numeric value
can be anywhere between 1655000 and about 1664999.99999999.

Implicit in your question might be "why does the number appear this way?"
and "how do I avoid it?".

Presumably, the cell is formatted as Scientific with 2 decimal places.
Click on Format Cells Number. If you want a different format, select
General or perhaps Number with some number of decimal places.

As for how it got that way without your knowing it, perhaps you imported
data that included the number written as 1.66E+06.

PS: If the cell truly displays 1.66E06 without the "+", I would guess that
the cell was formatted as Text when data of that form was entered. In that
case, you might want to change the format to General or a numeric format,
then press F2 and Enter.



Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT +1. The time now is 10:16 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2019 ExcelBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Microsoft Excel"

 

Copyright © 2017